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Notable Players Who Avoided Arbitration In 2017

Notable Players Who Avoided Arbitration In 2017 Keith Allison via Flickr.com

MLB

Some big names avoided arbitration this off-season

As a new season approaches, arbitration eligible players are negotiating contract details with their current club. Here is a list of the notable players who were arbitration eligible this off-season, and have signed a deal for 2017 and beyond.


Danny Duffy signed a five-year deal worth $65 million to avoid arbitration. Duffy was in his last year of eligibility. He went 12-3 last season with a 3.51 ERA and 188 strikeouts in 42 games (26 starts) for the Kansas City Royals in 2016.

Ender Inciarte signed a five-year, $30.525 million deal with the Atlanta Braves to avoid arbitration. This was Inciarte’s first season of arbitration eligibility. By signing a deal for five years, it insures that Inciate will be under team control for an extra year. Inciarte played in 131 games for the Braves in 2016, and hit .291 with three home runs and 29 RBI’s.

Nolan Arenado signed a two-year deal worth $29.5 million with the Colorado Rockies. This deal will get Arenado through the 2018 season, but he will still be eligible for arbitration in 2019. Arenado hit .294 with 41 home runs and 133 RBI’s in 2016.

Jake Arrieta signed a one-year, $15.6 million deal with the Chicago Cubs to avoid arbitration. Arrieta is in his last year of arbitration, and is slated to become a free agent after the 2017 season if the Cubs do not re-sign him. Jake won the NL Cy Young Award in 2015, but came back down to earth a little in 2016, as he had a 18-8 record with 190 strikeouts and a 3.10 ERA.

Bryce Harper signed a one-year deal worth $13.6 million with the Washington Nationals to avoid arbitration. Harper will still have another year of eligibility left after the 2017 season. The 24-year-old outfielder had a down year in 2016 as he hit .243 with 24 home runs and 86 RBI’s.

Eric Hosmer and the Royals have agreed to a one-year, $12.25 million deal to keep the first baseman out of arbitration. Hosmer will be a free agent after the 2017 season, so the Royals will have a decision to make in the near future. The left-handed first baseman hit .266 in 2016 to go along with his 25 home runs and 104 RBI’s.

Todd Frazier avoided arbitration with a one-year, $12 million deal with the Chicago White Sox. Frazier is slated to become a free agent after the 2017 season. The 30-year-old third baseman hit just .225 with 40 home runs and 98 RBI’s in 2016 for the south siders. Last season was his first with the White Sox, but he will be back for another one in 2017.

Manny Machado and the Baltimore Orioles agreed to a one-year deal worth $11.5 million to keep the third baseman from reaching arbitration. Machado hit 37 home runs in 2016, and drove in 96 runs. He hit .294 and recorded a 6.7 WAR.

The Orioles also agreed to terms with pitcher Zach Britton on a one-year, $11.4 million deal. Britton had a 0.54 ERA in 69 appearances last season. He also went a perfect 47 for 47 on save opportunities in 2016. The 29-year-old struck out 74 batters in 67 innings, and was considered one of the top relievers in the game last year.


First baseman Jose Abreu and the White Sox have agreed on a one-year deal worth $10.8 million. This was Abreu’s first season of arbitration eligibility, as he has three years of big league experience. Abreu hit 25 home runs in 2016 to go along with his 100 RBI’s. This was Abreu’s worse season WAR wise (2.8), but he appeared in 159 games last year, the highest for a single season in his career.

Former Cy Young Award winner Dallas Keuchel and the Houston Astros agreed on a one-year, $9.1 million deal. This is Keuchel’s second season of arbitration eligibility. He regressed from his 2015 form last season as he went 9-12 with a 4.55 ERA and 144 strikeouts in 168 innings pitched.

Cleveland Indians and closer Cody Allen have agreed to a one-year deal worth $7.35 million. Allen converted 32 saves in 35 opportunities last season, and had 87 strikeouts in 68 innings pitched.

Center fielder Charlie Blackmon and the Colorado Rockies have agreed to a one-year, $7.3 million deal. Blackmon had a great 2016 campaign as he hit .324 with 29 home runs and 82 RBI’s. The 30-year-old has been in the middle of some trade rumors since the signing of Ian Desmond by the Rockies. Where ever Blackmon lands, he will be a valuable piece to have under control.

Matt Harvey and the New York Mets agreed to a one-year, $5.1 million deal. Harvey is in his second season of eligibility, but has been battling injuries for much of his career. He made only 17 starts in 2016 and recorded a 4.86 ERA to go along with his 4-10 record. The right-hander is only 27 years old, so he has plenty of chances to bounce back.

Shortstop Xander Bogaerts and the Boston Red Sox agreed to a one-year deal worth $4.5 million. This is Xander’s first year of eligibility. He hit .294 with 21 home runs and 89 RBI’s last season. His numbers dropped some from his 2015 campaign, but he still had a respectable season for the Red Sox in 2016.

Gerrit Cole and the Pittsburgh Pirates agreed to a one-year, $3.75 million deal to keep the 26-year-old from going to arbitration. Cole made 21 starts for the Pirates in 2016, and had a record of 7-10. His 3.88 ERA in 2016 was more than a run higher than his 2015 mark. His strikeout percentage dropped in 2016 as he only struck out 98 batters in 116 innings pitched.

Jackie Bradley Jr. and the Boston Red Sox agreed on a one-year, $3.6 million deal. Bradley had his best season as a big leaguer in 2016. He hit .267 with 26 home runs and 87 RBI’s. He set his career high in home runs, batting average, RBI’s, WAR, and OPS. Jackie is only 26 years old, and should have a bright future ahead of him in Boston.

Summary:

Many big name players were arbitration eligible this off-season. Now that most of them have agreed to a deal for 2017 and beyond, they can start focusing on the upcoming season that is only four months away.

**All contract details from Spotrac.com.